The Role of building Information Modeling (BIM) for MEP

How Do BIM Services Help You In Optimizing The Building Information  Management?Of late, the construction industry has been dealing with issues such as over-budget projects, declining productivity and failing to meet delivery dates. As economies stall around the world, builders continue to demand better buildings delivered within budget and on time BIM Services. Architects, engineers and MEP contractors are thus constantly striving for newer ways to improve productivity, lower costs and streamline the building design and delivery process. BIM which is an information-rich technology that allows the digital representation of building projects simulating the design, planning, construction and operation of a facility has instilled a hope to minimize these issues to a large extent.

Regarded as a promising, new technology, BIM has been widely adopted for MEP projects as it has pre-construction, design and fabrication benefits. BIM provides MEP engineers with integrated, highly coordinated and internally consistent computable information about the Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing system for planning, managing, decision-making and operating the facility. Using these offerings, designing a complicated structure can be done with ease, increased accuracy and efficiency. Since BIM allows creation of a virtual 3d model, it gives a better idea of the outcome of their systems before they are actually built.

The space for MEP systems is typically reserved before the MEP system is defined. Thus while designing a complex and a bigger size building, squeezing the MEP system into the building can sometimes become challenging. At such times, the 3d BIM model helps in collision detection – reducing the risk of construction cost overruns. A BIM model is an intelligent computable model and hence the ducts, pipes, walls and beams are actual defined entities and their functional relationships between building elements and systems is clear. This enables a holistic design approach which integrates not only the MEP disciplines, but the process as well – featuring an integrated digital environment for design, documentation and analysis.

BIM creates a virtual MEP model comprising of heating and cooling system, ducts and plant-room layout, electrical power and lightening layout, domestic water plumbing and gas piping system layout and fire protection system layout, thus offering a systematic and meticulous analysis of the system to be built. This analysis would help in increased efficiency, accuracy and coordination of the system reducing the time and cost involved in it.

BIM’s ability to digitally represent a building before it is actually built also allows firms to create, manage and share design information more effectively – resulting in increased profitability, reduced potential errors and risks and fewer inefficiencies in MEP building design. With the help of BIM, detailed views of mechanical, electrical and plumbing system are possible which will improve the quality of the overall project and ability to communicate the design intent. In the AEC industry, the advent of building information modeling (BIM) concept was viewed by many as an evolution to better 2d and 3d computer-aided design (CAD) techniques. Very few saw it as an interdisciplinary, collaborative tool that would drastically change the design-build project workflow, the management structure of AEC firms, the teaming models, the delivery standards, and the role of key disciplines involved.

As opposed to the vertical communication channels and delivery methods required by the traditional design-build approaches which mainly employ CAD, BIM necessitates an open and integrated horizontal collaboration channel between all the key stakeholders of the project: facility owners, designers/architects, MEP (M&E) engineers, consultants and contractors. To realise the benefits of employing BIM as compared to 3d CAD modelling tools, firms need to significantly invest in knowledge/skills development, personnel training, management restructuring, and software tools. However, more than these tangible investments, AEC companies need a complete change in mindset in case they want to adopt BIM for their projects.

Whilst many professionals, especially those from small and medium-sized firms, see it as an extension of 3d CAD, BIM is anything but 3d CAD. It is a much larger concept which involves extensive pre-construction planning and multidisciplinary coordination to virtually model building facilities using smart parametric objects embedded with rich accurate information. This intelligent model then can be used by all stakeholders to extract respective views and relevant information thereby resulting in timely decision-making and project delivery.

Though BIM and 3d CAD are not mutually exclusive to each other, they have major differences as far as the approach and the output is concerned. In traditional 3d CAD, depending on the scope of project, architects prepare a set of construction drawings, including the plans, sections, and elevations. Since all these views are independent entities, any change in one view has to be manually updated in others. As a result, the process is not only time-consuming but also increases the scope for errors.

On the contrary, a building information model contains the architectural, structural and MEP system models of the proposed facility. It is prepared during the design and planning stage using details from all the key stakeholders including designers, engineers, MEP contractors, and subcontractors. Since a single database-driven model represents details required by all disciplines, any changes made by any of the team members are automatically updated across the model to plans, sections and elevations. Hence, all the project team members are updated on all the changes made by others thereby saving time, reducing cost resulting from duplication of efforts, and increasing the overall quality of construction drawing sets. Thus making small changes to the architectural plan would result in those changes appearing simultaneously in the section, elevation or schedule for the same change to the plan.

Furthermore, the building blocks of 3d CAD models are lines, circles, arcs, and other graphical entities, which lack the flexibility of data analysis. These models only serve as geometric objects devoid of detailed parameters which are required by the entire AEC supply chain. In contrast, BIM models comprise building elements and intelligent systems, including columns, beams, and walls, which contain rich data related to parameters. If needed, additional parameters can be added to the pre-existing ones for more detail. And, this rich data can be effectively shared across disciplines for rich collaboration and on-time delivery.

Of late, the construction industry has been dealing with issues such as over-budget projects, declining productivity and failing to meet delivery dates. As economies stall around the world, builders continue to demand better buildings delivered within budget and on time BIM Services. Architects, engineers and MEP contractors are thus constantly striving for newer ways to…

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